Do you call you call yourself a Christian?

Every week I read multiple Blogs and Bloggers opinions and I can tell you that there are some very interesting ones out there.  This week I ran across an old  blog from man named named John Smulo.  He wrote a post entitled “Five Reasons I Hate Telling People I’m Christian”.  As I read this simple post I was struck with this thought, I usually agree with most of his post this one I did not.  So I wanted to spend some time giving my “Six Reasons I Love Telling People I’m Christian”.

It is conversation stopper, instead of a conversation starter. When I say, “I am a Christian,” I’m not shouting “I’ve been saved!” I’m whispering, “I was lost. That’s why I chose this way”
It communicates something other than what I mean. When I say, “I am a Christian,” I don’t speak with human pride I’m confessing that I stumble, and need Christ to be my guide.
I’ll lose out on potential friendships because of the stereotypes this word conveys. When I say, “I am a Christian,” I’m not bragging of success I’m admitting that I’ve failed and cannot ever pay the debt.
‘Christian’ is associated with a lot of things, but almost none of them have anything to do with Jesus Christ. When I say, “I am a Christian,” I don’t think I know it all I submit to my confusion asking humbly to be taught.
It provokes hurt, anger, and angst for people who’ve had painful experiences with Christians. When I say, “I am a Christian,” I’m not claiming to be perfect My flaws are far too visible.
When I say, “I am a Christian,” I still feel the sting of pain I have my share of heartache which is why I seek His name.

Despite the all of the preconceived notions that coincide with the word “Christian” I truly believe that it is my job to represent the one who saved us.  The first known usage of the term can be found in the New Testament, in Acts 11:26: “the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch.” The term was thus first used to denote those known or perceived to be disciples of Jesus Christ. In the two other New Testament uses of the word (Acts 26:28 and 1 Peter 4:16) it refers to the public identity of those who follow Jesus. I think that the word should be redefined and fought for by those of us who follow Christ.  Because of my skin color many people have presuppositions on who I am and what I do/ sound like.  It may not be fair but I refuse to accept those false assumptions as true, neither should we do that with Christ name. This is just my opinion I could be wrong!

What do you think?  Do you agree or disagree?  With whom?  Please comment below…..

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About Jon Nelson

I am just a nobody trying to tell everybody about Somebody [Christ Jesus]!

Posted on February 9, 2010, in ...from Jon, Apologetics, Theology. Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. I think you are taking to task the concept of being disassociated with the name of Christ, which I do see happening in some circles. If one does that, then I don’t know what hope they are offering. On the other hand, it is true that the word “Christian” has become synonymous with “Right-wing, Republican, Homophobic, Culture-Warrior”, especially in America. So if someone chooses to use terms like Christ-follower or something similar to try to diffuse some of the Pat Robertson stink off the word Christian, I don’t have a problem with that. In fact, depending on the situation I will intentionally use words like that rather than Christian. The important thing is making sure that Christ is our message. The word we use is secondary. My $0.02

  2. I like the term Christian. And like it or not, you are actually commanded to love Pat Robertson more than you are the world or lost. They will know we are Christians by our love…for each other.

    I tire of throwing Christians under the bus. Whether you agree with them on every cultural thing or not. They are your brothers and sisters.

    (Preaching to myself here, but not to Pats, more like to Rob Bell types…)

    • Sure – but I can still be in distinct disagreement with Pat Robertson (or whoever – Joel Osteen also comes to mind) and want to make clear that when I identify myself with Christ that doesn’t mean I’m in lock step with what you might hear come out of their mouths. I don’t avoid the word Christian in all circumstances. But if I know someone has had their feathers severely ruffled by certain Christians, I think it’s best to refocus the conversation on Christ rather than those who claim to speak for Him the loudest. Whether that means the tactic of avoiding the word Christian or not depends on the circumstance.
      Maybe that’s hypersensitivity on my part.

  3. WOW, both Matt and Brice comment on my blog on the same day? I must be blessed. I know and respect you both and am seriously honored that you goys read. That being said, I know that we are each on the same page, in that the supremacy of Christ is 1st and foremost to our lives. It’s a shame that the name that so many have died for is being avoided like it’s the plague. Like I said earlier His name was given to publicly identify “those who follow Jesus. I think that the word should be redefined and fought for by those of us who follow Christ. Because of my skin color many people have presuppositions on who I am and what I do/ sound like. It may not be fair but [until the day I die] I [will] refuse to accept those false assumptions as true, neither should we do that with Christ name.”

  4. Of course you sound like a black preacher, right?

    And you do know all black people too…

    (and Matt, believe me I disagree with a lot of Christians, especially armenians).

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